Recognition, Redistribution and Popular Participation: Towards an Integrative Judicial Policy

Workshop brings feminists together to discuss law in Brazil

May 8th, 2017

The event promoted interaction between different instances in the discussion of gender issues, such as violence, discrimination and inequality.

Source: ESMPU
Workshop Opening Table Weaving Threads to Discuss Feminist Law Criticism in Brazil

Workshop Opening Table Weaving Threads to Discuss Feminist Law Criticism in Brazil

Brazilian law was in evidence during two days of the Workshop “Weaving Threads to Discuss Feminist Criticisms of Law in Brazil” (04 and 05 May). To theparticipants, mostly women, criticism was presented of the theoretical production of women's rights and challenges to be overcome in each area of ​​law, especially civilians and the application of the Maria da Penha Law.

The event, which was supported by the Higher School of the Public Prosecution Service of the Union (ESMPU), promoted interaction between different instances (national and international) in the discussion of gender issues, such as violence, discrimination and inequality.

In welcoming those present, ESMPU's Deputy Director-General, Labor Deputy Attorney General Sandra Lia Simón, said that Brazilians are currently witnessing the overwhelming attack on human and social rights. “Nonsense is being made against the labor protection that affects today's and future workers and, as a result, all families. In those times, what we have left is mobilization and resistance and movements like this are fundamental. ”

The opening table, which took place on Thursday morning (04 / 05), brought together women active in public agencies such as the Public Prosecution Service and the Judiciary, and non-governmental organizations (NGOs). In their speeches, they emphasized the urgency of realizing the rights of women who are guaranteed by law.

This was the focus given by the coordinator of the Center for Women's Studies and Research at the University of Brasília (NEPEM) Lourdes Bandeira, who stressed that domestic violence is still persistent. “This is not a lack of laws, as we have the Maria da Penha Law and the Femicide Law. It turns out that there is a huge gap between the application of these laws and the condition of infrastructure and effectiveness, ”he explained.

The representative of the consortium of feminist NGOs that drafted the Maria da Penha Bill Myllena Calasans de Matos said that the workshop comes at a time when practices propose changes in conduct and legislative projects seek to weaken the Maria de Pena Law. She cited cases of women being accused of parental alienation and court rulings that require shared custody even in a family context with a history of domestic violence. "This can be an obstacle to the effective enforcement of the Maria da Penha Law and the recognition that violence against women is violence against human rights."

The Justice Forum Coordinator, Rosane Reis Lavigne, spoke about the dynamics surrounding the justice system, emphasizing that the entity intends to constitute a new structure for this system and, in a constructivist way, to give meaning to the expression “integrative model of Justice”.

Gender discrimination was also remembered. According to UN Women in Brazil Office representative Nadine Gasman in Brazil, where political structures are based on sexism, racism and other forms of discrimination, women need access to justice in order to live their political citizenship with fullness.

For the president of the CNJ Permanent Commission on Access to Justice and Citizenship, Daldice Maria de Almeida, the defense of women's rights needs to be a permanent action of the State, since they are still in situations of risk and inequality. “The state is constituted by society. Defending women and the family is a constitutional provision. ”

The activity was an initiative of the Latin American and Caribbean Committee for the Defense of Women's Rights (CLADEM / Brazil); NGOs Citizenship, Study, Research, Information and Action (CEPIA) and Gender, Justice and Human Rights (THEMIS); the Feminist Center for Studies and Advisory (CFEMEA); the Center for Women's Studies and Research at the University of Brasilia (NEPEM / UNB); and the Center for Popular Legal Advice, University of São Paulo at Ribeirão Preto Law School (NAJURP / USP / Ribeirão Preto).

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